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Tutorial! Caroline’s Christmas Tree Quilt

Caroline made the beautiful Christmas Tree Quilt in our new Christmas shop window display and we get so many comments on it! Festive and bright, it mixes traditional colours with modern prints and lots of metallic gold for wow factor! She created this quilt design based on her long-time love of strip piecing and recent discovery of triangle rulers, two elements that simplify the construction.

Caroline's Christmas Tree Quilt Tutorial

We put together a bundle of the fabrics Caroline used for her quilt and you can find it in the shop here. Please note, the default option for this bundle is skinny quarters because that’s what Caroline used so if you want fat quarters please be sure to leave us a comment on your order. Doesn’t this bundle just make you want to start singing dec the halls?

Update/correction: Caroline used 11 fabrics for her quilt. The one that is missing from this picture is Christmas on Brambleberry Ridge – Timber Valley in Cranberry Metallic by Violet Craft (Michael Miller) because it is now sold out. You need at least nine different quarter metres for this project but you are free to use more!

Caroline's Christmas Tree Quilt Bundle

Clockwise from top, this bundle includes:

Christmas on Brambleberry Ridge – Timber Valley in Evergreen Metallic by Violet Craft (Michael Miller)
Pixie NoelPixie Floral in White by Tasha Noel (Riley Blake)
Christmas on Brambleberry Ridge – Shimmer Reflection in Red by Violet Craft (Michael Miller)
Christmas on Brambleberry Ridge – Brambleberry in Evergreen Metallic by Violet Craft (Michael Miller)
SparkleSnowflake Sparkle in Gold Metallic (Riley Blake)
Juniper BerryHolly Berry in Winter Vanilla by Basic Grey (Moda)
Christmas on Brambleberry Ridge – Brambleberry in Burgundy Metallic by Violet Craft (Michael Miller).
Postcards for SantaDeer in Gold by My Mind’s Eye (Riley Blake)
Christmas on Brambleberry Ridge – Shimmer Reflection in Green by Violet Craft (Michael Miller)
Winter Essentials IIIRibbons in Red (Studio E)

Now, over to Caroline! This tutorial will make a 39” x 59” finished quilt – a great size for a throw.

Materials:

Construction:

1. Cut your fabric into 2 ½” x WOF (width of fabric) strips.

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2. Lay the strips out in groups of four. I used eight groups of four strips each. Sew the strips together and press the seams to the darker strips.

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3. Use your triangle ruler and cut the patchwork strips into 40 triangles. Your seam allowance is in the ruler.

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4. Cut your white triangles on the grain. For your half triangles, make sure to leave a ¼” seam allowance and trim with your ruler. I am using the patchwork half triangle for a reference only.

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They will look like this:

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5. Lay out all of your triangles. Number your rows and take pictures so you can refer back to them when sewing your triangles together.

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6. Let’s sew! Sew your triangles together, making sure to match the corners.

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7. Once you’ve completed your eight rows, sew the rows together. After joining the rows, press the seam upwards, so your triangles end up with a sharp tip.

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8. Baste and quilt as desired. I used Dream Puff wading for a fluffier quilt and quilted in the ditch so the quilting lines are two inches apart. If you use Dream Puff, I don’t recommend quilting closer together or you could get some bunching.

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I use Pilot Frixion Pen to mark my quilting lines. The lines disappear with a hot iron (but test your fabric first!)

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9. I used all of my scraps to make a fun binding. My binding was about 5 ½ metres long. Bind using your preferred method.

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Have fun!!! And be cosy this Christmas.

Caroline's Christmas Tree Quilt tutorial

Caroline's Christmas Tree Quilt tutorial

Comments { 1 }

Tutorial! Quilted Christmas table runner

We have such a fun Christmas project for you today! Caroline designed this quilted table runner based on the simplest of briefs (I want a table runner! made of triangles!) and it is seriously adorable. It brightens up our shop and it is just the perfect thing to decorate your table for Christmas lunch or to put under the mince pies and carrots you leave out for Santa and his reindeer!

Quilted Christmas table runner

The finished table runner you see here is 18” x 28 ½” but you’ll have enough fabric to customise your size if you grab one of the skinny quarter bundles we put together for this project. Our bundle mixes traditional red and green with pops of peach, gold and icy blue. There are so many opportunities for fussy cutting too, using the adorable designs by Aless Baylis from Festive Friends. You can find this bundle in the shop here.

Christmas Table Runner Bundle
This bundle includes, clockwise from top:

Cotton and Steel BasicsNetorious in Anna Peach (Cotton and Steel)
Festive Friends – Friends in Aqua by Aless Bayliss (Dashwood Studio)
Studio ChristmasMini Candy Cane Stripe in Red (Michael Miller)
TwistGold (Dashwood Studio)
Festive Friends – Friends in Pink by Aless Bayliss (Dashwood Studio)
HandmadeDot in Red by Bonnie & Camille (Moda)
Kona Cotton SolidsWillow (Robert Kaufman)
Festive Friends – Puddings by Aless Bayliss (Dashwood Studio)

Quilted Christmas table runner

Quilted Christmas table runner

Materials:

Construction:

1. To make the table runner in the same size as the pictures, cut 40 triangles + 8 corners on grain using the 5 ½” triangle measurement on your ruler. I used 23 triangles + 1 corner of designer fabric and 17 triangles + 7 corners of stash builders and solids.

Quilted Christmas table runner
2. Arrange your triangles in rows at random until you’re happy with the layout. When planning my layout, I arranged the directional pieces to face one way on half of the table runner and the opposite way on the other side, so when you’re looking at it from your side of the table it will look right-side-up.

I used four rows of triangles to fit my table but you can adjust the layout with your own table measurements and add more triangles to fit to size. You should have enough fabric to cut additional triangles but keep in mind that fussy-cutting takes extra fabric.

Quilted Christmas table runner

3. Sew your triangles together into strips and press the seams open.

Quilted Christmas table runner

4. Sew the strips together.

Quilted Christmas table runner
5. Spray or pin baste. Quilt as desired and bind. I used very simple straight line quilting and bound the quilt by machine.

Quilted Christmas table runner

Top with decorations or treats and enjoy!

Quilted Christmas table runner

Comments { 0 }

Christmas 2016 window display at our West Hampstead shop!

This window! It is so full of amazing, gorgeous things and I love it so much and am so proud! I hope you’ll come by our West Hampstead shop and see everything in person.

Christmas 2016 Shop Window

First, the garments! These were sewn by Kym.

On our lady we have a stunning party dress made by mashing up two Sew Over It dress patterns! The bodice is from the Betty Dress and the skirt is from the Rosie Dress.

Christmas Betty Dress

The fabric is the Brambleberry in Burgundy Metallic print from Christmas on Brambleberry Ridge by Violet Craft and has gold ink that shimmers when the light hits it.

Christmas Betty Dress

Christmas Betty Dress

We’ve put two tulle underskirts under there to give it that lovely full silhouette. It’s such a stunner!

Christmas Betty Dress

Our little man is wearing a simplified Oliver + S Art Museum Vest in Ho Ho Ho in Red from Winter Essentials IV. Kym used it for the front and the back so it’s just so fun and charming (so stealing this for Harvey!) The shorts are Oliver + S Sketchbook Shorts in Robert Kaufman‘s Manchester in Charcoal.

christmas-vest-1

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He’s also wearing a bow tie in Shimmer Reflection in Green from Christmas on Brambleberry Ridge made using this tutorial and our go-to white button down Oliver + S Sketchbook Shirt.

Christmas Bow Tie

Our little girl is wearing a Made by Rae Geranium Dress (we can’t get enough of this pattern) in Timber Valley in Evergreen Metallic from Christmas on Brambleberry Ridge and it’s the cutest, loveliest Christmas dress ever!

Christmas Geranium Dress

Christmas Geranium Dress

Christmas Geranium Dress

Caroline made the quilt using a Christmas tree block she created and it looks so good! We’ll be sharing a tutorial on this quilt next week.

Caroline's Christmas Tree Quilt

We put a bundle of the fabrics she used for the trees together you can find it here. It’s lots of Christmas on Brambleberry Ridge and a few other gorgeous fabrics with metallic gold or red and green designs.

Caroline's Christmas Tree Quilt

It’s hard to see in pictures, but the background fabric is Large Snowflake Pigment on White from Winter Essentials IV by Studio E.

Caroline's Christmas Tree Quilt

A few of the fabrics Caroline used were directional, and when you cut the trees for these blocks you end up with upside-down triangles that are perfect for bunting. If you make both projects, this is a no-waste fabric situation!

Christmas Bunting

Christmas Bunting

She backed the bunting with Tangly Lights in Santa from All the Trimmings by Riley Blake and used white bias binding to string them together.

Christmas Bunting

Kym made the toddler-sized tree based on the free Stanley Tree pattern from Sewaholic. With the larger version of the pattern as a starting point, we re-drew the tree to make it as tall as possible while still fitting on half the width of standard fabric. The fabric we chose for the tree is Corny Cane in Green from Holiday by Michael Miller and it’s so perfect for this project!

Sewaholic Stanley Tree

Kym also made the smaller version of the pattern for our table with scraps from the big tree. We topped both with a simple red ribbon bow.

Sewaholic Stanley Tree

Kym shared her top five tips for sewing a Stanley Tree if you’d like to make your own!

Sewaholic Stanley Tree

Comments { 3 }

Tutorial! Sara’s Mendocino fish quilt block

We sent Sara a bundle of Mendocino a few months ago with the task of creating a quilt for a window display in our West Hampstead shop (we’ll share the new window next week!) Sara previously made this gorgeous Tiger Lily quilt so we couldn’t wait to see what she’d make with the latest Heather Ross collection. Needless to say, we were not disappointed. This quilt is a stunner!

Sara is back today on The Daily Stitch to show us how to whip up those awesome fish blocks! Take it away, Sara!

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

I was so inspired by all of the amazing makes with Mendocino at Quilt Market, especially the fantastic octopus and seahorse quilts (check them out in Annie’s Quilt Market report). In the same vibe, I decided to make a shoal of fish swimming amongst the mermaids and octopi.

Materials

For the fish blocks, I used:

  • 19 FQ from Mendocino for the main bodies of the fish in the pink-brown-orange colourways (I repeated three to make 22 fish) – there was lots left over
  • 1m of Kona in Aqua for the fish backgrounds

For the quilt background, I used:

¼ inch seam is used throughout. The finished quilt measures approximately 45×55 inches.

Cutting

For each fish block, cut the following, using the template. I traced this onto template plastic to help with fussy cutting.

From main fabric:

1 x fish body piece

1 x fish tail piece

From background fabric:

2 x fish body background piece

2 x fish tail background piece

1 x fish tail end piece

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

Piecing

1. Take the main body piece and the two body background pieces, fold them in half lengthways and finger press the centre line. For the background pieces, you should be matching the end points of the curve, rather than the ends of the fabric.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

Place the body piece on top of one of the background pieces, right sides together, with the centre creases matching.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

2. Match each end point of the fish body piece with the end of the curve on the background piece and pin. Find the mid point between the centre pin and each end pin and pin here, too. You can finger press another crease between the end and the centre crease to make sure that this is accurate, but I don’t bother with this part. The pinned piece will look full of folds, but it will come together, I promise!

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

3. Start stitching the pieces together at one end. The trick is to go slowly and stop frequently to check that the edges are still aligned and to move excess fabric from one side to the other, to ensure that it doesn’t get caught in the needle. I find that it helps to hold the fabrics up at an angle with my left hand whilst sewing. The important thing is not to stretch the fabric to try to make it fit the curve – this will cause a misshapen finished block that won’t lie flat. Press the seam towards the background fabric.

4. Take your second body background piece, making sure that you have the longer sides matching, and align and pin the centre creases, right sides together.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

This time you need the background piece to overlap your existing seam by ¼ inch.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

5. Pin and sew in the same way as for the first seam, lifting the fabric up slightly with your left hand if that makes things easier.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

6. Press the seam towards the background fabric again. You should have something that looks a bit like this – but I must confess that I pressed one of the seams the wrong way in this block, so it looks slightly different!

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

7. You will notice that there is a smaller amount of background fabric at one end of your block. Line up your ruler so that one line cuts through the two points of the fish body, and trim this end down to just under ¼ inch from the end of the fish.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

8. Now we’ll piece the tail. Take the main tail piece and the two background tail pieces and make the centre creases as you did for the body.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

9. Pin the centre crease and each end, overlapping the background piece at the point of the tail (where it will join the body) by ¼ inch.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

10. Sew the seam with the same method you used for the body, and press the seam towards the background fabric. You should have something that looks like this.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

11. Pin your second tail background piece in the same way, ensuring that it overlaps by ¼ inch at the point of the tail.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

Sew and press seams towards the background fabric.

12. Take your tail end piece and fold it so that the two ends of the curve match. Finger press a crease at the centre of the curve, and in the centre of the curve of your main tail piece. Match and pin the centre creases.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

13. Pin the ends of each curve as you did for the body and tail pieces. Take the straight edge pieces and shift these so that they are at 90 degrees to the main tail background pieces. It will look something like this, but ignore the fact that I had got ahead of myself and already sewed the tail to the body in this photo!

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

14. Sew the tail end seam, stopping with the needle down when you get to the beginning of the the curve and rotating the fabric to keep your ¼ inch seam allowance. Sew the curve in exactly the same way as for the body and the tail, stopping again when you get to the end of the curve and rotating to sew the final straight seam. Press towards the background fabric.

15. Trim the little triangles of fabric at the point of the tail so that you have a straight edge. Try to ensure that you have one of the lines of the ruler cutting through the centre of the tail so that you have a 90 degree angle, and keep the seam allowance as close to ¼ inch as you can (it will be slightly smaller, which you want).

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

16. Line up the trimmed ends of the tail and body pieces and pin. To make sure that the tail and the body meet in the right place, I put a pin through the point of the tail piece and then put this through the point of the body piece.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

Sew and press this final seam.

17. Finally, trim your block. How much you need to trim depends on what size you want your block to be. There is quite a lot of extra fabric on all sides, so that I could be flexible in this stage. I trimmed the bare minimum, just to ensure that the block was squared up.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

Finishing the quilt

To make the quilt top, I pieced 22 fish blocks together improvisationally, inserting extra pieces of background fabric to give the shoal movement. The quilt background is simply pieced from 6.5” blocks in a mixure of Kona Aqua, four blue Mendocino prints, and a few 9-patch blocks randomly pieced in Kona Aqua, Azure and Bahama Blue in order to create a dappled effect.

I quilted using wavy lines and used leftovers from the pink prints for the binding.

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

Mendocino quilt fish block tutorial

Comments { 5 }

Caroline’s Sommer strip quilt tutorial

Caroline made the prettiest pink and green quilt for our early spring shop window display using fabrics from Sommer by Sarah Jane and coordinating Kona Cotton Solids! This is a super simple strip quilt but the result is an absolutely adorable gift for a baby girl’s nursery.  Plus it makes use of that darling border print!

Sommer strip quilt tutorial

Strip quilts couldn’t be easier so we aren’t providing a full tutorial, but I asked Caroline to share her fabric list, measurements and layout to take the guesswork out of making a similar quilt if you want to use this idea.

PLEASE NOTE, FABRIC AND MATERIALS REQUIREMENTS AND LAYOUT HAVE BEEN UPDATED FOLLOWING USER FEEDBACK

You will need:

Fabric

A. Kona Cotton Solids – Pear (1.5 metres for backing and front strips)
B. Sommer – Sommer Swan in Grass (.5 metre)
C. Sommer – Sommer Garden in Bloom (.25 metre)
D. Kona Cotton Solids – Primrose (.75 metre for front strips and binding)
E. Sommer – Tulip Tangled in Bloom (.25 metre)
F. Sommer – Garden Shadow in Meadow (.25 metre)
G. Sommer – Sundborn in Blossom (.25 metre)
H. Sommer – Tulip Folk in Bloom (.25 metre)
I. Sommer – Double Border in Summer (1 metre – you’ll only use the border from one side of the piece, so you’ll have leftovers for cushions or another use!)

Please note that you need skinny or long quarters of these fabrics, so make sure to put in this request before you check out. You can also call or email us with your order number after you purchase to request skinny quarters.

Other Supplies

Cot size wadding – Caroline used Quilters Dream Natural Request cotton wadding. Please note, if you use this size wadding it will be a close fit to the size of your quilt, without much overhang. If you prefer more wiggle room, opt for a larger size wadding. 
505 Basting Spray (or basting pins)
Thread for piecing and quilting (Caroline used Aurifil 50wt in 3320)

Sommer strip quilt tutorial

Cutting

– Cut 4″ strips out of fabrics A-H
– Cut an 11″ strip out of fabric I (the border print)
– Cut a 43″ piece of fabric A (main backing fabric)

All fabric strips should be the full width of the fabric

Sewing

Sew fabrics with a 1/4″ seam allowance

Quilt front layout

Sommer Quilt Top_updated

Quilt back layout

Sommer strip quilt tutorial

Here is a picture of the full quilt for reference. I didn’t manage to actually get a full shot of the back, unfortunately!

Sommer strip quilt tutorial

Finishing

– Press the quilt top and back.
– Baste as desired. Caroline used 505 Basting Spray.
– Quilt, bind and enjoy!

Sommer strip quilt tutorial

Sommer strip quilt tutorial

 

Comments { 3 }

Meet our teachers: Jenny Haynes of Papper, Sax, Sten, quilting

We are thrilled to introduce our newest teacher, Jenny Haynes. A Swedish exile who spent the previous 18 years in Hackney, Jenny creates bespoke quilts and furnishings for her label ‘Papper, Sax, Sten‘ (that’s ‘Paper, Scissors, Stone’ if you’re wondering!) that reflect these different influences. Her pieces are recognised for their clean and simple mid-century modern design and the mixing of vintage fabrics with modern prints, rich colours with pastels, wool and silk with linen and cotton.

Jenny Haynes Papper Sax Sten

Jenny will be teaching four classes at The Village Haberdashery, beginning with Patchwork Techniques: Machine Pieced Curves on Saturday, 12 March. In this inspiring one-day class you’ll learn to sew beautiful curves on your machine whilst Jenny guides you through the process of cutting and piecing a lap or baby sized quilt top using her own curvy sunflower design. Click here to sign up for a place in any of Jenny’s classes and read on to learn more about her!

Learn how to machine piece curves with jenny haynes

Your work has such a distinct aesthetic. Are you influenced by your Swedish roots? How would you describe your style?

Yes definitely. With so many great designers, of furniture, textiles and ceramics, I think Swedes take the aesthetics for granted a bit. Someone (who’s opinion I value highly) once described my Sunflower Quilt as calm. That serene and non-hectic design that many Swedish makers are known for has always appealed to me.

Jenny Haynes Papper Sax Sten

Jenny Haynes Papper Sax Sten

You have a background in pattern cutting, tailoring and fashion, but your business is creating patchwork quilts and home furnishings. What led you to your current niche?

It all started with quilts. It’s something I’ve always made and it’s always been about shapes and textiles and never about fashion. I don’t think the years I’ve spent as a Pattern Cutter has changed me much apart from making me even more obsessed about matching seams.

Jenny Haynes Papper Sax Sten

Jenny Haynes Papper Sax Sten

I love that you share sketches of your designs on Instagram in the very early stages. Does feedback from the sewing community help you progress your projects?

I’ve been a late starter with social media. It is a lovely thing to be surrounded by other creative minds. It’s a creative hub without the shared studio space. I’ve got such a clear idea in my head though and the part of the process that will make me change a design is usually experimentation, figuring things out whilst working with the fabrics.

Jenny Haynes Papper Sax Sten

Jenny Haynes Papper Sax Sten

You regularly include elements that intimidate a lot of quilters (i.e. mixing fabric substrates, piecing curves). Any tips for tackling fear?

Don’t start with your favourite fabric, try on something else first. Also I always go for the difficult option first and then simplify or change to a more forgiving fabric if my idea doesn’t work.

Jenny Haynes Papper Sax Sten

Jenny Haynes Papper Sax Sten

Your first class at The Village Haberdashery is Patchwork Techniques: Machine Pieced Curves on Saturday, 12 March. What will students learn?

Of course we’ll cut, sew and press many, many curves but I will also share lots of little tricks I’ve picked up along the way: how to mark your fabric using a pin, what an unpicker is brilliant for except unpicking and my favourite way to edge finished quilt.

Jenny Haynes Papper Sax Sten

Jenny Haynes Papper Sax Sten

Comments { 1 }

Free pattern and tutorial: Emmajané’s Arrows Quilt

We’re thrilled to have a new free pattern for you today from Emmajané of Stitch and Pieces. Her lovely new Arrows Quilt is now gracing the new window display at our West Hampstead shop. When we posted a sneak peak on Instagram, you guys went wild for this quilt, so I know you’re going to be exited to get your hands on this pattern! Take it away, Emmajané!

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I love half rectangle triangles and I have found a way of creating them without use of fancy rulers. This quilt uses half rectangle triangles and rectangles to create arrows.

Fabric Requirements:

*24 fat quarters (the list of the Kona Cotton Solids I used is given later in the cutting instructions)
*300cm of fabric for the backing and border
*50cm of fabric for the binding
*I used a double size piece of wadding, which is 96” x 93”

Recommended tools:

*Quilter’s ruler
*Fabric pen

Notes:

Finished quilt size 60” x 82”.

Seam allowance is ¼” throughout.

When making the half rectangle triangles press the lighter fabric seam over the darker fabric seam.

WOF refers to width of fabric.

Cutting and Preparation:

Cut the following fabrics to create 6” x 4” rectangles. The letters in brackets indicate what the fabrics will be referred to afterwards in the cutting instructions and in the pattern. The number at the side tells you how many 6” x 4” rectangles to cut. These will be used to create the half rectangle triangles.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Cut the following fabrics to create 5” x 3” rectangles.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Cut the following fabrics to create 5” x 1¾” rectangles. These will be the small rectangles at the beginning and end of the rectangle rows.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

You need to cut 7 strips 3” x WOF for the border of the quilt. (I used the same as my backing, Plum).

You will also need to cut 7 strips 2½” x WOF for the binding. (I used Shadow).

Making the Half Rectangle Triangles (HRT):

There are two types of half rectangle triangle blocks to make. For ease these are going to be called 1 or 2.

HRT 1 uses Fabrics A and B. This is how the finished block is finished:

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

To make the HRT 1:

Take the two of the 6” x 4” rectangles from the correct colours. These will be called Fabric A and Fabric B. The fabric which will be on the left hand side will be right side up (here this is grey) and the fabric which will be on the right hand side will be wrong side up (here this is pink).

Then using the half inch mark on your quilter’s ruler, with a fabric pen mark a half inch on the grey fabric in the bottom left corner and top right corner. Mark a half inch on the pink fabric in the in the top left corner and bottom right corner. Then still using the fabric marker, join the dots with the quilter’s ruler.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Now place the wrong side fabric on top of the right side fabric, taking care to match the dots and line with one another.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Pin and then sew a ¼” seam either side of the line.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Using your rotary cutter, cut down the line.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Press the two blocks, ready to trim

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

This is where it gets tricky! You are going to trim these blocks to create a 5” x 3” block, but in order to get points that are perfect when you start sewing blocks together you need to cut accurately.

It’s best to trim the shorter sides first. Make sure that there is enough fabric to cut a 5” side, but make sure that ⅛” is in the bottom fabric.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Check that at the other side you have the angle at the correct point so that you get ⅛” of the other fabric there as well.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

When you then trim the longer 5” edge you need to make sure that there is ⅛” of each fabric included in your trimming. It’s a bit fiddly, but you will get the hang of it.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Done correctly your block should look like this:

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

It does look like you’ve gone wrong because there is a blunt point, but you are going to need it like that for later (trust me).

This table shows you the combinations to pair together to make the HRT 1 blocks:

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Once you’ve got the hang of this, making the HRT 2 should be straightforward, but here are some photos and an explanation to help out:

Making HRT 2:

HRT 2 uses Fabrics C and D. This is how the finished block is finished:

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

This time our wrong side facing fabric will have the quarter inch dots at the bottom left and top right. The right side facing fabric will have the quarter inch dots at the top left and bottom right. Like before draw a line using a fabric pen on both fabrics to join the dots.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Match the lines as before and pin. Then sew a ¼” seam either side of the line. Then use the rotary cutter to create the two blocks.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Once again, press the seams and get ready for the tricky business of trimming!

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Use the same technique as before. Make sure you trim with a ⅛” as you did previously.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

This table shows you the combinations to pair together to make the HRT 2 blocks:

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

The hard work is now done! It’s time to get piecing this quilt. Starting from top to bottom the pieces need sewing together like this:

Row 1

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 2

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 3

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 4

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 5

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 6

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 7

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 8

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 9

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 10

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 11

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 12

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 13

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 14

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 15

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 16

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 17

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt tutorial

Once all the pieces have been sewn into rows, sew the rows together as you would with any other quilt. I then sewed my border strips together and sewed these around the arrows section.

It’s now time to press the quilt top really well and remove any loose threads.

Basting and Quilting:

Make the quilt sandwich, using your preferred method. Quilt as desired. I quilted each of the arrows with my walking foot. I quilted the arrows in threads to match the fabric colour.

Trim the quilt in preparation for attaching the binding.

Binding:

Sew the seven strips together. Fold in half and press. Attach using a ¼” foot and then either hand or machine finish.

Thank you, Emmajane!

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Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Several months ago I was wandering around an Anthropologie when I saw these awesome neon trimmed chambray oven gloves.

Oven Gloves from Anthropologie

I instagrammed them and then filed the idea away in the back of my mind as one I could share with you as a DIY, since we totally have all the supplies! So, I give you a tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves!

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Supplies:

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

First, you’re going to want to make a pattern with one of your existing oven gloves. Look how well-loved my Cath Kidston glove is!  Make sure to either trace with a half-inch seam allowance or plan to trace the seam allowance onto your fabric.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Cut 1 1/2 inch bias strips from your neon fat quarter. You’ll need about a metre to a metre and a half of bias (I’m guesstimating since I made these ages ago and didn’t measure!)

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Sandwich your wadding in between your fabric. We’re going to quilt the whole thing and then cut our pieces out afterward. If you want to avoid wasting fabric, use your pattern as a guide to what you’ll need and cut your pieces close to size.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Now grab your ruler and a marking pencil (I used a pink chaco liner pen – love these!) and draw your stitching lines an inch apart on the top fabric.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

I was originally going to do a grid, but once I saw how cool the lines looked stitched in just one direction I left it simple. (Design choice not just laziness, obviously!)

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Quilt your fabric sandwich.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

And use your pattern to cut your pieces out of your quilted fabric – one for each side of each glove (so four pieces if you’re making a set of two.)

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Sew two pieces together with the 1/2″ seam allowance.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Snip as close as possible to the stitching line between the thumb and hand.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Finish the raw edges with an overlocker, zig-zag stitch or pinking shears. To avoid bulk in the thumb, either trim away excess seam allowance before finishing or just try to get in close to your seam when you overlock/pink.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Sew the little bias tape tab that’s going to stick off of your glove by making a three-inch tube and turning it inside out or just pressing the raw edges in and edge stitching it (like me).

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Turn your glove inside out, using a point turner to get the fiddly bits if necessary. Enclose the raw edges at the glove’s opening in bias, pin and machine stitch.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Fold the tab and pin the raw edges under the bias wherever you want it on the glove. Machine stitch the bias all the way around (I did a sloppy job on mine as you can see in this picture. Don’t rush!)

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

And ta da! You have awesome oven gloves to give as a gift or keep for yourself and brighten up your own kitchen!

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Aren’t they fun?

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

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Star Block of the Month: December is the Puzzle Star #starbotm

I’m so thrilled to have Charlotte Newland leading our first-ever Block of the Month adventure! Charlotte will be teaching a class on this month’s block, the Puzzle Star, on Monday, 14 December, 6:30pm – 9pm. If you’re following along at home, you can find all of the blog posts about the Star Block of the Month here and we sell kits here. Don’t forget to tag any Instagram posts related to the Star Block of the Month with #starbotmTake it away, Charlotte!

Puzzle Star Tutorial from the Star Block of the Month

Welcome back to the Star Block of the Month! We’ve almost reached the end of our starry journey, and are finishing with a nice simple block – the Puzzle Star

This block is made up entirely of half-square triangles, and we will be making two 12 inch blocks (12.5 inches unfinished), without sashing. This diagram gives you the arrangement of colours in the block. As usual, the blank areas are sewn from background fabric:

Puzzle Star Tutorial from the Star Block of the Month

Cool palette:

Puzzle Star Tutorial from the Star Block of the Month

Warm palette:

Puzzle Star Tutorial from the Star Block of the Month

Cut the following for each block:

Puzzle Star Tutorial from the Star Block of the Month

Let’s make those HSTs. Draw a diagonal line across the wrong side of the eight 4.5” background squares, and put them in pairs with the colour 1 and colour 2 squares:

Puzzle Star Tutorial from the Star Block of the Month

Sew a scant 1/4” from each side of the drawn line on each pair, then cut along the line to make two HSTs:

Puzzle Star Tutorial from the Star Block of the Month

Press with the seam towards the darker fabric, and trim to 3.5” x 3.5”, making sure the 45º line on your ruler is in line with the seam. You will end up with eight HSTs in each colour:

Puzzle Star Tutorial from the Star Block of the Month

Lay out the pieces according to the block diagram and sew together. Easy peasy!

Puzzle Star Tutorial from the Star Block of the Month

Stay tuned for next week, when I’ll be showing you how to join all your blocks together to make the quilt top.

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Dorothy’s patchwork Christmas tree skirt

A Christmas tree skirt is a beautiful way to decorate your tree! In her tutorial, our lovely customer Dorothy shows us how to make a festive patchwork tree skirt that you’ll use for years and years to come. She used shop favourite Tinsel by Cotton + Steel for this project, but you’ll find a huge selection of Christmas fabric in the shop to choose from for yours. Now then, let’s crack on with the tutorial! Thank you, Dorothy!

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Christmas Tree Skirt (56” x 56”)

Supplies:

Quilt top
2.25 meters for squares
1.25 meters background

Binding & backing
.5 meter binding
Backing and wadding for 64” square

Thread

Cutting instructions:

From scraps cut: 496 2.5” squares
If cutting from yardage you will need 31 strips

From background cut: 88 4.5” square
Cut 10 strips

Binding – 7 strips

Screen Shot 2015-11-18 at 13.58.55

Piecing instructions:

Seam allowance ¼”

Place the 2.5” squares in opposite corners of the background square, draw a diagonal line across the small square, sew on that line and trim with ¼” seam allowance.

Sew – 16 with only 1 corner

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Sew – 72 with 2 corners

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

From these make the following:

Block A – Sew 8

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Block B – Sew 16

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

With the remaining 336 2.5” squares.

Block C – Sew 21

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Lay out blocks in the following octagon:

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

NOTE: In haste, I trimmed the corner blocks before I quilted. I would suggest you trim after the tree skirt as been quilted to avoid stretching the bias edge.

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Layer backing, wadding and top then quilt as desired, I did continuous circular quilting. A tutorial on that can be found here.

Pick one side and mark the straight line down the center.

Draw a circle in the center block, approx. 4.5”.

Sew ¼” on either side of the straight line and ¼” on the outside of the circle.

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

AFTER you have sewn, cut on the drawn lines.

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Binding is attached in 2 stages; straight edges first then the center circle.

Stage 1
Make binding for this stage with 6 strips. Attach binding to straight edges only, there are eight 135-degree angles on this tree skirt and I found this tutorial extremely useful.

Raw edges at the base of the circle is ok, they will be covered in stage 2.

Finish by hand or machine.

Stage 2
Attach binding to center circle with extra to tie.

In theory this should be bias binding, however I used one strip of straight cut fabric. It does not lie flat, but stands a bit upright. I do not see this as a problem as it will be flush with the tree trunk.

Press in ½” of the raw edges in at either end of the strip.

Fold the length of the strip in half and press.

Open up and fold raw edges towards the center and press.

There should be three press lines marked along the length of the strip.

Open up strip and attach to the circle, centering it so that there is equal on either side for the tie.

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Sew on the line around the circle only.

Fold the binding to the back and top stitch the length of the strip, ensuring that there are no raw edges exposed.

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

And you’re done! Tie it around your tree and enjoy.

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt

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