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Star Block of the Month: June is the Exploding Star #starbotm

I’m so thrilled to have Charlotte Newland leading our first-ever Block of the Month adventure! She’ll be teaching a new block the first week of every month on The Daily Stitch and the second Monday of the month in our West Hampstead shop. The Exploding Star class is this Monday, 8 June at 6:30pm and you can sign up here!

If you’re following along at home, you can find all of the blog posts about the Star Block of the Month here and we sell kits here. Don’t forget to tag any Instagram posts related to the Star Block of the Month with #starbotm. Take it away, Charlotte!

Welcome back to the Star Block of the Month! This month we are making the Exploding Star, which uses no-waste flying geese, half square triangles, and has an economy block in the middle.

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery

We will be sewing two 18” blocks (18.5” unfinished), without sashing. This diagram gives you the arrangement of colours in the block. As usual, the blank areas are sewn from background fabric:

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery

Cool palette:

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery



Warm palette:

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery



Cut the following for each block:

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery



First, we are going to make the centre of the block, a simple economy block. Cut the two 4” x 4” colour 3 squares in half diagonally. I like to starch them before cutting to minimise the wibbly bias edge effect. Sew the triangles to the 4.75” background square as shown below, then trim to 6.5” square, making sure that the points where the seams intersect are at least 1/4” away from the edge, otherwise you will lose them in your seam allowance when you sew the block together.

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery
Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery



Next we will use the no-waste method to make the flying geese. Take your four 3 7/8″ colour 2 squares and draw a diagonal line across each one. Place two of the squares right sides together with the 7.25″ background square, sew a scant 1/4″ from each side of the line, then cut in half as below:

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery
Press the triangle pieces away, then sew another colour 2 square to each of these two pieces, stitching a scant 1/4″ away from the drawn line as usual. Cut each of these in half, press the coloured triangle away from the background piece, and trim each flying goose to 6.5″ x 3.5″:
Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery
Repeat this process using the four 3 7/8″ colour 3 squares and 7.25″ colour 2 square to make a total of eight flying geese units (four of each set):
Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery

Finally we need to make half-square triangles. Draw a diagonal line across the wrong side of the four 4.5” background squares, and put them in pairs with the 4.5” colour 1 squares. Sew a scant 1/4” from each side of the drawn line on each pair, then cut along the line to make two HSTs. Press with the seam towards the darker fabric, and trim to 3.5” x 3.5”, making sure the 45º line on your ruler is in line with the seam:

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery

Lay out your pieces to match the block diagram and sew together:

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery

Repeat with the other set of fabrics to make a pair of blocks:

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery

That’s it for this month – see you in July!

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Star Block of the Month: May is the Amish Star #starbotm

I’m so thrilled to have Charlotte Newland leading our first-ever Block of the Month adventure! She’ll be teaching a new block the first week of every month on The Daily Stitch and the second Monday of the month in our West Hampstead shop. The Amish Star class is this Monday, 11 May at 6:30pm and you can sign up here!

If you’re following along at home, you can find all of the blog posts about the Star Block of the Month here and we sell kits here. Don’t forget to tag any Instagram posts related to the Star Block of the Month with #starbotm. Take it away, Charlotte!

Welcome back to the Star Block of the Month! This month we are making the Amish Star, which uses no-waste flying geese and half square triangles.

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm

We will be sewing two 12” blocks (12.5” unfinished) and making them up to 18.5” (unfinished) with sashing. This diagram gives you the arrangement of colours in the block. As usual, the blank areas are sewn from background fabric:

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm

Cool palette:

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm

Warm palette:

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm

Cut the following for each block:

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm

First we are going to make the flying geese using the no-waste method just like last month. Take your four 2 7/8″ background squares and draw a diagonal line across each one. Place two of the squares right sides together with the 5.25″ colour 1 square, sew a scant 1/4″ from each side of the line, then cut in half as below:

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm

Press the triangle pieces away, then sew another background square to each of these two pieces, stitching a scant 1/4″ away from the drawn line as usual. Cut each of these in half, press the background triangle away from the colour 1 piece, and trim each flying goose to 4.5″ x 2.5″:

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm

Next we need to make half-square triangles. Draw a diagonal line across the wrong side of the four 3.5” background squares, and put them in pairs with the 3.5” colour 2 squares. Sew a scant 1/4” from each side of the drawn line on each pair of squares, then cut along the line to make two HSTs. Press with the seam towards the darker fabric, and trim to 2.5” x 2.5”, making sure the 45º line on your ruler is in line with the seam:

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm

Lay out your pieces to match the block diagram and sew together to make a 12.5” block:

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm

Cut the sashing strips as below, then add them according to the block layout diagrams. The sashing strips are the same size for both blocks, only the layout is different.

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm



Attach the 12.5” pieces to the top and bottom of the block first, press, then add the 18.5” strips to the sides.

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm



That’s it for this month – see you in June!

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Star Block of the Month: March is the Folded Star #starbotm

I’m so thrilled to have Charlotte Newland leading our first-ever Block of the Month adventure! She’ll be teaching a new block the first week of every month on The Daily Stitch and the second Monday of the month in our West Hampstead shop.

If you’re following along at home, you can catch up with February’s block and January’s block and read more about this project here and here or pick up a kit here. Don’t forget to tag any Instagram posts related to the Star Block of the Month with #starbotm. Take it away, Charlotte!

Welcome back to the Star Block of the Month! This month we are making the Folded Star. It’s a slightly more complicated block, but to compensate there is only one of them.

We will be sewing one 12” block (12.5” unfinished) and making it up to 18.5” (unfinished) with sashing.
This diagram gives you the arrangement of colours in the block. As usual, the blank areas are sewn from background fabric.

The cool palette uses Bluebell (colour 1) and Regatta (colour 2):

The warm palette uses Meringue (colour 1) and Papaya (colour 2):

Cut the following for each block:

 

First, we are going to make the centre of the block, which is a simple square-in-square, or economy block. First, cut the two 3” x 3” colour 2 squares in half diagonally. I like to starch them before cutting to minimise the wibbly bias edge effect.

Sew the triangles to the 3 3/8” colour 1 square as shown below, then trim to 4.5” square, making sure that the points where the seams intersect are at least 1/4” away from the edge, otherwise you will lose them in your seam allowance when you sew the block together.

Next we need to make half-square triangles. Draw a diagonal line across the wrong side of the six 3.5” x 3.5” background squares, and put them in pairs with the 3.5” x 3.5” coloured squares:

Sew a scant 1/4” from each side of the drawn line on each pair of squares, then cut along the line to make two HSTs. Press with the seam towards the darker fabric, and trim to 2.5” x 2.5”, making sure the 45º line on your ruler is in line with the seam. You will have a total of twelve HSTs, eight in colour 1 and four in colour 2:

Assemble the four corner patches of the block using one 2.5” background square, two colour 1 HSTs and one colour 2 HST:

Now we are going to use the 5.75” squares to make quarter square triangles (QSTs), or hourglass blocks. Draw a diagonal line across the wrong side of the two 5.75” background squares, and put them in pairs with the 5.75” colour 2 squares. Sew a scant 1/4” from each side of the drawn line on each pair of squares, cut along the line to make HSTs and press towards the coloured fabric:

Place the HSTs right sides together in pairs so that the coloured fabric is against the background fabric and draw a diagonal line (perpendicular to the seam):

Sew a scant 1/4” from each side of the drawn line on each pair of HSTs, and cut along the line to make QSTs. Press the seam open and trim each block to 4.5” x 4.5”, making sure the 45º line on your ruler is in line with one diagonal seam:

Repeat to make four QSTs:

Lay out your pieces to match the block diagram and sew together to make a 12.5” block.

Add the sashing according to the block layout diagrams. Attach the 12.5” pieces to the top and bottom of the block first, press, then add the 18.5” strips to the sides.

That’s it for this month – see you in April!

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Star Block of the Month: February is the Ribbon Star! #starbotm

I’m so thrilled to have Charlotte Newland leading our first-ever Block of the Month adventure! She’ll be teaching a new block the first week of every month on The Daily Stitch and the second Monday of the month in our West Hampstead shop. If you’re following along at home, you can read more about this project here and here or pick up a kit here. Don’t forget to tag any Instagram posts related to the Star Block of the Month with #starbotm. Take it away, Charlotte!

I can’t believe it’s February already! This time in the Star Block of the Month we are sewing the Ribbon Star, which is made up of half square triangles and a simple economy block in the centre.

We will be sewing two 8” blocks (8.5” unfinished) and making them up to 12.5” (unfinished) with sashing.

This diagram gives you the arrangement of colours in the block, with the specific shades listed in the tables below. The blank areas are sewn from background fabric.

Cool palette:

Warm palette:

For each block, cut the following:

First, we are going to make the centre of the block, which is a simple square-in-square, or economy block. Begin by drawing a diagonal line across the wrong side of the four 3” x 3” coloured squares:

Line up one edge of the 3 3/8” background square with the diagonal line drawn on the colour 1 square, and sew. Trim 1/4” away from the sewn line and press seam towards the coloured fabric:

Repeat with the other coloured squares, making sure that they are in the correct order:

Trim to 4.5” square, making sure that the points where the seams intersect are at least 1/4” away from the edge, otherwise you will lose them in your seam allowance when you sew the block together.

Next we need to make half-square triangles. Draw a diagonal line across the wrong side of the four 3.5” x 3.5” background squares, and put them in pairs with the 3.5” x 3.5” coloured squares as below:

Sew a scant 1/4” from each side of the drawn line on each pair of squares, then cut along the line to make two HSTs:

Press with the seam towards the darker fabric, and trim to 2.5” x 2.5”, making sure the 45º line on your ruler is in line with the seam:

You will have a total of eight HSTs, two in each colour:

Lay out your pieces to match the block diagram, then sew together to make an 8.5” block.

Cut sashing strips from background fabric:

Add the sashing according to the block A and B layout diagrams. Attach the 8.5” pieces to the top and bottom of the block first, press, then add the 12.5” strips to the sides.

That’s it for this month – see you in March!

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Star Block of the Month: January is the Lemoyne Star! #starbotm

I’m so thrilled to have Charlotte Newland leading our first-ever Block of the Month adventure! She’ll be teaching a new block the first week of every month on The Daily Stitch and the second Monday of the month in our West Hampstead shop. If you’re following along at home, you can read more about this project here and here or pick up a kit here. Don’t forget to tag any Instagram posts related to the Star Block of the Month with #starbotm. Take it away, Charlotte!

Welcome to the Star Block of the Month! We are starting off with a nice, straightforward block made with half-square triangles (HSTs) – the Lemoyne Star.

We will be sewing two 8” blocks (8.5” unfinished) and making them up to 12.5” (unfinished) with sashing. The sashing is identical in both blocks.

This diagram gives you the arrangement of colours in the block, with the specific shades listed in the tables below. The blank areas are sewn from background fabric.

Cool palette:

Warm palette:

Draw a diagonal line across the wrong side of the four 3.5” x 3.5” background squares, and one each of colour 1 and colour 3. Put the squares together in pairs as below:

Sew a scant 1/4” from each side of the drawn line on each pair of squares, then cut along the line to make two HSTs:

Press the seam towards the darker fabric and trim to 2.5” x 2.5”, making sure the 45º line on your ruler is in line with the seam:

Lay out your pieces to match the block diagram, then sew together to make an 8.5” block.

Add the sashing as below. Attach the 8.5” x 2.5” pieces first, press, then add the 12.5” x 3.5” and 12.5” x 1.5” strips.

Repeat, to make a pair of blocks:

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Kits now available for our Star Block of the Month!

Have you heard about our Block of the Month Club yet? Led by Charlotte Newland, this will be a fun way to learn new patchwork techniques and put together a gorgeous quilt top over the course of the year. Each block will be a version of a star and there will be four block sizes that all fit together, with some repeats, to make up a 64″ x 82″ quilt top.

Are you in? There are two ways you can participate:

  • Charlotte will introduce a new block here on The Daily Stitch the first week of every month. If you want to participate at home, you can follow along with the blog and the Instagram hashtag #starbotm.
  • If you live in London, you can take part in our monthly Star BOTM classes at our West Hamsptead shop! Classes will take place on the second Monday of the month but we have only six places, so it’s a good idea to sign up early (and often!) You can find the classes here.

Today we’re pleased to announce we now have our kits ready for the Star BOTM! You have two colourways to choose from:

Here is the cool colourway:

cool-star-botm-kit

block of the month cool

And here is the warm colourway:

warm-star-botm-kit

block of the month warm

If you’d like to choose your own fabrics, you’ll need:

  • 12 fat quarters (50 x 56cm)
  • 8 fat eighths (50cm x 28cm)
  • 1.75m background fabric

Please get in touch with any questions at info@thevillagehaberdashery. We hope you’ll join us!

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Introducing our first Block of the Month Club!

I’m so excited to tell you about our new Block of the Month Club! Led by Charlotte Newland, this will be a fun way to learn new patchwork techniques and put together a gorgeous quilt top over the course of the year.

block of the month cool

Charlotte will introduce a new block here on The Daily Stitch the first week of every month. Each block will be a version of a star and there will be four block sizes that all fit together, with some repeats, in the end to make up a 64″ x 82″ quilt top. If you want to participate at home, you can follow along with the blog and the Instagram hashtag #starbotm.

We’ll also be offering a class on each block in our West Hampstead shop! Classes will take place on the second Monday of the month but we have only six places, so it’s a good idea to sign up early (and often!) You can find the classes here.

block of the month warm

We are putting together two kits for this pattern using Kona Cotton Solids in cool and warm colourways and Widescreen in Grey as the background. You will be able to purchase them very soon! If you’d like to choose your own fabrics, you’ll need:

  • 12 fat quarters (50 x 56cm)
  • 8 fat eighths (50cm x 28cm)
  • 1.75m background fabric

Please get in touch with any questions at info@thevillagehaberdashery. We hope you’ll join us in this awesome new project!

 

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Emmajane’s Ribbons Baby Quilt tutorial

I love this new quilt pattern by Emmajane McNulty of Stitch and Pieces! This baby-size quilt is perfect for fussy cutting and it’s so fun that she basically used “boy” colours to make a “girl” quilt (you know, because there are unicorns…) It’s so fresh, bright and pretty. Read on for the tutorial!

Ribbons-Quilt-bench

This baby quilt is called “Ribbons” because I used three colours with squares and half rectangle triangles to create ribbons of colour. To get this look I used 5 blue fabrics, 4 green fabrics and 4 lilac fabrics.

1 Fat Quarters

Fabric Requirements:
13 fat quarters (five “blues”, four “greens”, four “lilacs”)
130cm of fabric for the backing
half a metre of fabric for the binding
44” x 50” of wadding
Recommended tools:
Quilter’s ruler
Fabric pen

Notes:
Finished quilt size 39” x 44”
Seam allowance is ¼” unless stated otherwise
When making the half rectangle triangles press the lighter fabric seam over the darker fabric seam.
Before starting this quilt it is important to plan your cutting. I had a unicorn print in three different colours which was perfect for fussy cutting and having centred in the 6” square blocks.

2 Fussy Cutting

Cutting and Preparation:
Cut 13 6” squares from the blue fabrics
Cut 12 6” squares from the green fabrics
Cut 10 6” squares from the lilac fabrics
Cut 16 7” x 4” rectangles from the blue fabrics
Cut 16 7” x 4” rectangles from the green fabrics
Cut 12 7” x 4” rectangles from the lilac fabrics

Making the Half Rectangle Triangles (HRT):
There are two types of half rectangle triangle blocks to make. For ease these are going to be called A or B.

To make the HRT A:
Take the two of the 7” x 4” rectangles from the correct colours. The fabric which will be on the left hand side will be right side up (here this is blue) and the fabric which will be on the right hand side will be wrong side up (here this is green).

3 Half Rectangle Triangles

Then using the half inch mark on your quilter’s ruler, with a fabric pen mark a half inch on the blue fabric in the bottom left corner and top right corner. Mark a half inch on the green fabric in the in the top left corner and bottom right corner.

4 Half Rectangle Triangles

Then still using the fabric marker, join the dots with the quilter’s ruler.

5 Half Rectangle Triangles

Now place the wrong side fabric on top of the right side fabric, taking care to match the dots and line with one another.

6 Half Rectangle Triangles

Pin and then sew a ¼” seam either side of the line.

7 Half Rectangle Triangles

Using your rotary cutter, cut down the line.

8 Half Rectangle Triangles

Press the two blocks, ready to trim.

9 Half Rectangle Triangles

This is where it gets tricky! You are going to trim these blocks to create a 6” x 3¼” block, but in order to get points that are perfect when you start sewing blocks together you need to cut accurately.
It’s best to trim the shorter sides first. Make sure that there is enough fabric to cut a 3¼” side, but make sure that ⅛” is in the bottom fabric.

10 Half Rectangle Triangles

Check that at the other side you have the angle at the correct point so that you get ⅛” of the other fabric there as well.

11 Half Rectangle Triangles

When you then trim the longer 6” edge you need to make sure that there is ⅛” of each fabric included in your trimming. It’s a bit fiddly, but you will get the hang of it.

12 Half Rectangle Triangles

14 Half Rectangle Triangles

Done correctly your block should look like this:

13 Half Rectangle Triangles

It does look like you’ve gone wrong because there is a blunt point, but you are going to need it like that for later (trust me).

This table should help you to work out how many of each HRT A blocks to make and where to place the dots:

Number of finished HRT A Fabrics to use Right side facing when cutting
Dots: bottom left & top right Wrong side facing when cutting
Dots: top left & bottom right
9 blue and green 5 blue 7” x 4”
5 green 7” x 4” blue green
6 green and lilac 3 green 7” x 4”
3 lilac 7” x 4” green lilac
6 lilac and blue 3 lilac 7” x 4”
3 blue 7” x 4” lilac blue

Once you’ve got the hang of this, making the HRT B should be straightforward, but here are some photos and an explanation to help out:

This time our wrong side facing fabric will have the quarter inch dots at the bottom left and top right. The right side facing fabric will have the quarter inch dots at the top left and bottom right. Like before draw a line using a fabric pen on both fabrics to join the dots.

15 Half Rectangle Triangles

Match the lines as before and pin. Then sew a ¼” seam either side of the line. Then use the rotary cutter to create the two blocks.

16 Half Rectangle Triangles

17 Half Rectangle Triangles

Once again, press the seams and get ready for the tricky business of trimming!

18 Half Rectangle Triangles

Use the same technique as before. Make sure you trim with a ⅛” as you did previously.

19 Half Rectangle Triangles

This second table shows you how many of each HRT B blocks to make and where to place the dots:

Number of finished HRT B Fabrics to use Right side facing when cutting
Dots: top left & bottom right Wrong side facing when cutting
Dots: bottom left & top right
9 blue and green 5 blue 7” x 4”
5 green 7” x 4” blue green
6 green and lilac 3 green 7” x 4”
3 lilac 7” x 4” green lilac
6 lilac and blue 3 lilac 7” x 4”
3 blue 7” x 4” lilac blue

The hard work is now done! It’s time to get piecing this quilt.

Prepare your layout so it looks like this: (You should see the ribbons of the three fabric colours.)
20 Piecing

Now sew the rows together.

21 Piecing

Your pieced half rectangle triangles should look like this, which is a little strangle looking but they will give you a lovely point when you use your ¼” foot:

22 Piecing

When you sew rows together be sure to press one row of seams one way the next row of seams the other so that your seams can nestle nicely next to each other when you sew the rows together.

23 Nestling seams

Your pieced quilt top will look like this:

24 Pieced

Press the quilt top really well and remove any loose threads.

Basting and Quilting:

Make the quilt sandwich, using your preferred method. Quilt as desired. I quilted tramlines with my walking foot and followed the ribbons. To emphasise the colours I quilted the blue ribbon in a blue thread, the green in a green and the lilac in a lilac thread.

25 Quilting
26 Threads for quilting

Trim the quilt in preparation for attaching the binding.

Binding:

I decided to machine bind this quilt, but you can do it by hand if you wish. When I machine bind I use 2¾” strips. If I hand bind I use 2½” strips. Whichever way you need to cut five strips in total.
Sew the five strips together. Fold in half and press. Attach using a ¼” foot and then either hand or machine finish.

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The Village Haberdashery

Our new Summer-to-Autumn shop window display!

Our little window is a bit eclectic this month! It started as kind of a tribute to Cotton + Steel’s debut collections, and then sort of sprawled, as these things tend to do, and now I can’t really remember how we got to were we are. And so. It’s a little bit Cotton + Steel, a little bit Chambray Union and a lot of Kona Cotton Solids. I absolutely love it. Here is a little more info about our samples.

The Village Haberdashery

I usually go left to right, but let’s start with the quilt first this time since it truly ties our window together. Our quilt is sewn by Charlotte Newland, who is teaching a class on this very pattern at this very moment! The pattern is Simply Sampled by Jeni Baker and it looks really amazing in Kona Cotton Solids. We selected the 20 solids for the front by picking out all the colours of the entire Cotton + Steel rainbow. No, we didn’t write these down. But that would have been a swell idea…

Here is the list of Konas: Ice frappe, Navy, Coral, Ash, Cerise, Candy green, Emerald, Curry, Pewter, Blush Pink, Wasabi, Pond, Petal, Salmon, Spice and Mango. The sashing is PFD Bleached White, the border is Ash and the backing and binding are Navy. Whew!

The Village Haberdashery

The first little outfit is the Oliver + S 2 + 2 Blouse and Pleated Skirt. The top is sewn in September Blue by Susan Driscoll for Dashwood Studio. The trim is in a coordinating Kona Cotton Solids by Robert Kaufman. The little skirt is sewn in Dot Chambray in Indigo from Chambray Union by Robert Kaufman, the one we can barely keep in stock (but we have a new bolt on the shelf at the time of this typing!) Both have pink buttons. This outfit was sewn by Charlotte.

The Village Haberdashery

The Village Haberdashery

The Village Haberdashery

The Village Haberdashery

The second little outfit is the Oliver + S Book Report Dress in All the States in Aqua from Hatbox by Alexia Abegg for Cotton + Steel and Kona Cotton Solids by Robert Kaufman with light blue buttons. Charlotte made this darling dress too.

The Village Haberdashery

The Village Haberdashery

The Village Haberdashery

On our lady we have a Traveler Dress by Lisette sewn by Zoe Edwards, who is going to be teaching a class on this pattern in November. The dress is sewn in Slub Chambray in Indigo from Chambray Union by Robert Kaufman and it fits me, and I love wearing it. Seriously – this is a class worth taking because this is a dress worth having!

The Village Haberdashery

The Village Haberdashery

The Village Haberdashery

I made the figure 8 cowl our lady is wearing using Window Vine Lawn in Navy from Homebody by Kim Kight for Cotton + Steel and Cambridge lawn in Mango by Robert Kaufman, along with a good helping of mini pom pom trim in aqua. You can find my tutorial for this project here.

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Kelly’s Lucky quilt tutorial (an Irish Chain quilt)

Another beautiful quilt from Kelly of Jeliquilts! Kelly likes a creative challenge so for this quilt, Charlotte and I picked out a stack of fabrics to co-ordinate with the palette we chose for the garments we wanted to feature in the latest shop window display. Then I sent it off to Kelly and let her work her magic. The result is a gorgeous Irish Chain quilt that is fresh and bright and so inviting.

get-lucky-newsletter1

This quilt has been on display in the shop for a couple of weeks now and has received so many compliments! I’m thrilled to finally share Kelly’s tutorial with you.

Fabric requirements

• 10 fat quarters in two colour groups (I used five blue and five green)
• 2 m background fabric (I used Kona bleached white)
• Lap sized wadding (56” x 67”)
• 1.75 m of 108” wide or 3 m of 42” wide fabric for backing
• 0.5 m for binding or make scrappy binding from the fat quarters

Annie’s note: we’ve created a very similar bundle to the one Kelly used and you can find it in the shop here.

SONY DSC

Notes

• Finished block size 10.5”
• Finished quilt size 52” x 67”
• Seam allowance is ¼” unless stated otherwise
• WOF = width of fabric

Cutting & preparation

Green FQs
Cut (5) 2”x WOF strips from each FQ and sub cut into (42) 2” squares per set, for a total of 210 squares.

Blue FQs
Cut (4) 2” x WOF strips from each FQ and sub cut into (36) 2” squares per set, for a total of 180 squares.

Background fabric
Cut (18) 2” x WOF strips and sub cut into (360) 2” squares.
Cut (15) 3.5” x WOF strips and sub cut into (120) 3.5” x 5” strips.

Binding fabric
For scrappy binding cut 2.5” x WOF strips from the left over FQs. You will need about 234”.

Backing fabric
For 42”-44” wide fabric – cut the 3m in half and sew together using a 3/8” seam allowance. Press the seam open. Backing needs to be 56” x 67”.

Making the mini blocks

NB: Press the seams well after each stage.

Make 2-patch blocks

SONY DSC

Sort (24) 2” squares from each of the 10 designs and sew together with 2” background square. Chain stitching will make this process go an awful lot faster!

You will end up with (120) green 2-patch blocks and (120) blue 2-patch blocks. Press seams well.

Make 4-patch blocks

SONY DSC

Sort the (120) green blocks into pairs and sew together to make (60) 4-patch blocks. Again, chain stitching will speed things up.

Repeat with the Blue 2-patch blocks to make (60) 4-patch blocks. Press seams well.

Make 9-patch blocks

SONY DSC

From the remaining 2” green squares, sort six of each design.

Sew a 2” background square to either side to make 30 blocks.

Sort all the remaining squares (12 of each design for both colours) of both colours into pairs (one green, one blue). Sew these either side of a 2” background square to make a total of 60 blocks.

Sort strips to avoid too many repeats in design and sew into (30) 9-patch blocks. Chain piecing really is your best friend here ;-). Press seams well.

Assembling the Irish chain block

Refer to the assembly diagram.

Figure 4 (Medium)

The fabrics that I used were non-directional, if you are using directional prints I suggest you carefully consider your layout before sewing.

Assembling the quilt top

Refer to layout diagram.

Figure 5 (Medium)

There should be a green square in the top left corner of each block as you lay them out.

Sew rows 1 – 5 together and press seams.

Sew rows A – F together and press seams.

Press the quilt top really well and remove any loose threads from the back.

Basting & quilting

Make the quilt sandwich, basting using your preferred method. Quilt as desired. I quilted a wonky wavy design with my walking foot, using an off-white 50wt Aurifil thread (#2021). This gave a lovely texture to the quilt but didn’t detract from the quilt design.

Cut away excess wadding and backing and square the quilt up.

Binding

For scrappy binding, join the strips cut from the leftover FQs end to end until you have about 234”. Alternatively, cut (6) 2.5” x WOF strips from a single fabric and join end to end. Fold binding in half lengthwise and press well.

Attach binding by machine using a 1/4” seam and then finish by hand or machine.

Sit back and admire!

SONY DSC

SONY DSC

SONY DSC

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