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Free pattern and tutorial: Emmajané’s Arrows Quilt

We’re thrilled to have a new free pattern for you today from Emmajané of Stitch and Pieces. Her lovely new Arrows Quilt is now gracing the new window display at our West Hampstead shop. When we posted a sneak peak on Instagram, you guys went wild for this quilt, so I know you’re going to be exited to get your hands on this pattern! Take it away, Emmajané!

IMG_0163

I love half rectangle triangles and I have found a way of creating them without use of fancy rulers. This quilt uses half rectangle triangles and rectangles to create arrows.

Fabric Requirements:

*24 fat quarters (the list of the Kona Cotton Solids I used is given later in the cutting instructions)
*300cm of fabric for the backing and border
*50cm of fabric for the binding
*I used a double size piece of wadding, which is 96” x 93”

Recommended tools:

*Quilter’s ruler
*Fabric pen

Notes:

Finished quilt size 60” x 82”.

Seam allowance is ¼” throughout.

When making the half rectangle triangles press the lighter fabric seam over the darker fabric seam.

WOF refers to width of fabric.

Cutting and Preparation:

Cut the following fabrics to create 6” x 4” rectangles. The letters in brackets indicate what the fabrics will be referred to afterwards in the cutting instructions and in the pattern. The number at the side tells you how many 6” x 4” rectangles to cut. These will be used to create the half rectangle triangles.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Cut the following fabrics to create 5” x 3” rectangles.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Cut the following fabrics to create 5” x 1¾” rectangles. These will be the small rectangles at the beginning and end of the rectangle rows.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

You need to cut 7 strips 3” x WOF for the border of the quilt. (I used the same as my backing, Plum).

You will also need to cut 7 strips 2½” x WOF for the binding. (I used Shadow).

Making the Half Rectangle Triangles (HRT):

There are two types of half rectangle triangle blocks to make. For ease these are going to be called 1 or 2.

HRT 1 uses Fabrics A and B. This is how the finished block is finished:

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

To make the HRT 1:

Take the two of the 6” x 4” rectangles from the correct colours. These will be called Fabric A and Fabric B. The fabric which will be on the left hand side will be right side up (here this is grey) and the fabric which will be on the right hand side will be wrong side up (here this is pink).

Then using the half inch mark on your quilter’s ruler, with a fabric pen mark a half inch on the grey fabric in the bottom left corner and top right corner. Mark a half inch on the pink fabric in the in the top left corner and bottom right corner. Then still using the fabric marker, join the dots with the quilter’s ruler.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Now place the wrong side fabric on top of the right side fabric, taking care to match the dots and line with one another.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Pin and then sew a ¼” seam either side of the line.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Using your rotary cutter, cut down the line.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Press the two blocks, ready to trim

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

This is where it gets tricky! You are going to trim these blocks to create a 5” x 3” block, but in order to get points that are perfect when you start sewing blocks together you need to cut accurately.

It’s best to trim the shorter sides first. Make sure that there is enough fabric to cut a 5” side, but make sure that ⅛” is in the bottom fabric.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Check that at the other side you have the angle at the correct point so that you get ⅛” of the other fabric there as well.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

When you then trim the longer 5” edge you need to make sure that there is ⅛” of each fabric included in your trimming. It’s a bit fiddly, but you will get the hang of it.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Done correctly your block should look like this:

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

It does look like you’ve gone wrong because there is a blunt point, but you are going to need it like that for later (trust me).

This table shows you the combinations to pair together to make the HRT 1 blocks:

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Once you’ve got the hang of this, making the HRT 2 should be straightforward, but here are some photos and an explanation to help out:

Making HRT 2:

HRT 2 uses Fabrics C and D. This is how the finished block is finished:

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

This time our wrong side facing fabric will have the quarter inch dots at the bottom left and top right. The right side facing fabric will have the quarter inch dots at the top left and bottom right. Like before draw a line using a fabric pen on both fabrics to join the dots.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Match the lines as before and pin. Then sew a ¼” seam either side of the line. Then use the rotary cutter to create the two blocks.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Once again, press the seams and get ready for the tricky business of trimming!

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Use the same technique as before. Make sure you trim with a ⅛” as you did previously.

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt

This table shows you the combinations to pair together to make the HRT 2 blocks:

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

The hard work is now done! It’s time to get piecing this quilt. Starting from top to bottom the pieces need sewing together like this:

Row 1

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 2

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 3

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 4

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 5

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 6

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 7

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 8

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 9

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 10

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 11

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 12

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 13

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 14

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 15

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 16

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt pattern

Row 17

Emmajané's Arrows Quilt tutorial

Once all the pieces have been sewn into rows, sew the rows together as you would with any other quilt. I then sewed my border strips together and sewed these around the arrows section.

It’s now time to press the quilt top really well and remove any loose threads.

Basting and Quilting:

Make the quilt sandwich, using your preferred method. Quilt as desired. I quilted each of the arrows with my walking foot. I quilted the arrows in threads to match the fabric colour.

Trim the quilt in preparation for attaching the binding.

Binding:

Sew the seven strips together. Fold in half and press. Attach using a ¼” foot and then either hand or machine finish.

Thank you, Emmajane!

Comments { 1 }

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Several months ago I was wandering around an Anthropologie when I saw these awesome neon trimmed chambray oven gloves.

Oven Gloves from Anthropologie

I instagrammed them and then filed the idea away in the back of my mind as one I could share with you as a DIY, since we totally have all the supplies! So, I give you a tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves!

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Supplies:

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

First, you’re going to want to make a pattern with one of your existing oven gloves. Look how well-loved my Cath Kidston glove is!  Make sure to either trace with a half-inch seam allowance or plan to trace the seam allowance onto your fabric.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Cut 1 1/2 inch bias strips from your neon fat quarter. You’ll need about a metre to a metre and a half of bias (I’m guesstimating since I made these ages ago and didn’t measure!)

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Sandwich your wadding in between your fabric. We’re going to quilt the whole thing and then cut our pieces out afterward. If you want to avoid wasting fabric, use your pattern as a guide to what you’ll need and cut your pieces close to size.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Now grab your ruler and a marking pencil (I used a pink chaco liner pen – love these!) and draw your stitching lines an inch apart on the top fabric.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

I was originally going to do a grid, but once I saw how cool the lines looked stitched in just one direction I left it simple. (Design choice not just laziness, obviously!)

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Quilt your fabric sandwich.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

And use your pattern to cut your pieces out of your quilted fabric – one for each side of each glove (so four pieces if you’re making a set of two.)

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Sew two pieces together with the 1/2″ seam allowance.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Snip as close as possible to the stitching line between the thumb and hand.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Finish the raw edges with an overlocker, zig-zag stitch or pinking shears. To avoid bulk in the thumb, either trim away excess seam allowance before finishing or just try to get in close to your seam when you overlock/pink.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Sew the little bias tape tab that’s going to stick off of your glove by making a three-inch tube and turning it inside out or just pressing the raw edges in and edge stitching it (like me).

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Turn your glove inside out, using a point turner to get the fiddly bits if necessary. Enclose the raw edges at the glove’s opening in bias, pin and machine stitch.

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Fold the tab and pin the raw edges under the bias wherever you want it on the glove. Machine stitch the bias all the way around (I did a sloppy job on mine as you can see in this picture. Don’t rush!)

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

And ta da! You have awesome oven gloves to give as a gift or keep for yourself and brighten up your own kitchen!

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Aren’t they fun?

Tutorial: Anthopologie-inspired neon and chambray oven gloves

Comments { 2 }

Star Block of the Month: December is the Puzzle Star #starbotm

I’m so thrilled to have Charlotte Newland leading our first-ever Block of the Month adventure! Charlotte will be teaching a class on this month’s block, the Puzzle Star, on Monday, 14 December, 6:30pm – 9pm. If you’re following along at home, you can find all of the blog posts about the Star Block of the Month here and we sell kits here. Don’t forget to tag any Instagram posts related to the Star Block of the Month with #starbotmTake it away, Charlotte!

Puzzle Star Tutorial from the Star Block of the Month

Welcome back to the Star Block of the Month! We’ve almost reached the end of our starry journey, and are finishing with a nice simple block – the Puzzle Star

This block is made up entirely of half-square triangles, and we will be making two 12 inch blocks (12.5 inches unfinished), without sashing. This diagram gives you the arrangement of colours in the block. As usual, the blank areas are sewn from background fabric:

Puzzle Star Tutorial from the Star Block of the Month

Cool palette:

Puzzle Star Tutorial from the Star Block of the Month

Warm palette:

Puzzle Star Tutorial from the Star Block of the Month

Cut the following for each block:

Puzzle Star Tutorial from the Star Block of the Month

Let’s make those HSTs. Draw a diagonal line across the wrong side of the eight 4.5” background squares, and put them in pairs with the colour 1 and colour 2 squares:

Puzzle Star Tutorial from the Star Block of the Month

Sew a scant 1/4” from each side of the drawn line on each pair, then cut along the line to make two HSTs:

Puzzle Star Tutorial from the Star Block of the Month

Press with the seam towards the darker fabric, and trim to 3.5” x 3.5”, making sure the 45º line on your ruler is in line with the seam. You will end up with eight HSTs in each colour:

Puzzle Star Tutorial from the Star Block of the Month

Lay out the pieces according to the block diagram and sew together. Easy peasy!

Puzzle Star Tutorial from the Star Block of the Month

Stay tuned for next week, when I’ll be showing you how to join all your blocks together to make the quilt top.

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Dorothy’s patchwork Christmas tree skirt

A Christmas tree skirt is a beautiful way to decorate your tree! In her tutorial, our lovely customer Dorothy shows us how to make a festive patchwork tree skirt that you’ll use for years and years to come. She used shop favourite Tinsel by Cotton + Steel for this project, but you’ll find a huge selection of Christmas fabric in the shop to choose from for yours. Now then, let’s crack on with the tutorial! Thank you, Dorothy!

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Christmas Tree Skirt (56” x 56”)

Supplies:

Quilt top
2.25 meters for squares
1.25 meters background

Binding & backing
.5 meter binding
Backing and wadding for 64” square

Thread

Cutting instructions:

From scraps cut: 496 2.5” squares
If cutting from yardage you will need 31 strips

From background cut: 88 4.5” square
Cut 10 strips

Binding – 7 strips

Screen Shot 2015-11-18 at 13.58.55

Piecing instructions:

Seam allowance ¼”

Place the 2.5” squares in opposite corners of the background square, draw a diagonal line across the small square, sew on that line and trim with ¼” seam allowance.

Sew – 16 with only 1 corner

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Sew – 72 with 2 corners

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

From these make the following:

Block A – Sew 8

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Block B – Sew 16

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

With the remaining 336 2.5” squares.

Block C – Sew 21

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Lay out blocks in the following octagon:

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

NOTE: In haste, I trimmed the corner blocks before I quilted. I would suggest you trim after the tree skirt as been quilted to avoid stretching the bias edge.

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Layer backing, wadding and top then quilt as desired, I did continuous circular quilting. A tutorial on that can be found here.

Pick one side and mark the straight line down the center.

Draw a circle in the center block, approx. 4.5”.

Sew ¼” on either side of the straight line and ¼” on the outside of the circle.

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

AFTER you have sewn, cut on the drawn lines.

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Binding is attached in 2 stages; straight edges first then the center circle.

Stage 1
Make binding for this stage with 6 strips. Attach binding to straight edges only, there are eight 135-degree angles on this tree skirt and I found this tutorial extremely useful.

Raw edges at the base of the circle is ok, they will be covered in stage 2.

Finish by hand or machine.

Stage 2
Attach binding to center circle with extra to tie.

In theory this should be bias binding, however I used one strip of straight cut fabric. It does not lie flat, but stands a bit upright. I do not see this as a problem as it will be flush with the tree trunk.

Press in ½” of the raw edges in at either end of the strip.

Fold the length of the strip in half and press.

Open up and fold raw edges towards the center and press.

There should be three press lines marked along the length of the strip.

Open up strip and attach to the circle, centering it so that there is equal on either side for the tie.

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Sew on the line around the circle only.

Fold the binding to the back and top stitch the length of the strip, ensuring that there are no raw edges exposed.

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

And you’re done! Tie it around your tree and enjoy.

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt tutorial

Patchwork Christmas tree skirt

Comments { 1 }

Handmade Christmas gift ideas! Projects to make for kids

We’ve hosted so many wonderful tutorials on The Daily Stitch over the years and I thought it would be fun to round up some favourite gift ideas in different categories. So here are some of the best ideas we’ve shared for children – just in time for Christmas!

Emily’s hexagon playmat – An awesome playmat that gathers into a bag so you can take toys to go or tidy up quickly.

Emily's Hexagon Playmat

Julie’s numbered bean bags – This fun set of felt and fabric numbered bean bags is great for toddlers on up. Look for fabrics you can fussy cut!

Julie's Bean bag tutorial

Camilla’s baby leg warmers – Such a sweet present for a baby – quick to knit and so adorable they are a gift for mum too!

Camilla's Baby Leg Warmers

Colette’s Little Bird Garland – A lovely little hand sewing project that makes a darling decoration for any child’s bedroom.

Colette's Felt Bird Garland

Laminated Kid Placemat – Make mealtimes super fun with a placemat created just for your kiddo.

Laminated Kid Placemat

Ruth’s Hot Water Bottle Cosy – A personalised hot water bottle cover makes a cuddly gift for older kids.

Ruth's Hot Water Bottle Cosy

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Star Block of the Month: October is the Double Star #starbotm

I’m so thrilled to have Charlotte Newland leading our first-ever Block of the Month adventure! Charlotte will be teaching a class on this month’s block, the Double Star, on Monday, 12 October, 6:30pm – 9pm. If you’re following along at home, you can find all of the blog posts about the Star Block of the Month here and we sell kits here. Don’t forget to tag any Instagram posts related to the Star Block of the Month with #starbotmTake it away, Charlotte!

Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery

Welcome back to the Star Block of the Month! This month we are making the Double Star, a nice straightforward block made up of squares and half-square triangles (HSTs).

We will be sewing one 12” block (12.5” unfinished) and sashing it to 18″ (18.5″ unfinished). This diagram gives you the arrangement of colours in the block. As usual, the blank areas are sewn from background fabric:

Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery

The cool palette uses orchid (colour 1), candy blue (colour 2) and capri (colour 3):
Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery

The warm palette uses petunia (colour 1), candy pink (colour 2) and valentine (colour 3):

Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery

Cut the following for each block:

Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery

Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery

We need to make a boat-load of HSTs for this star. Sort your 3.5″ squares into three piles: six of background + colour 2, six of background + colour 3, and two of colour 2 + colour 3:

Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery

Make HSTs in the usual way by drawing a diagonal line across the wrong side of the lighter square, sewing a scant 1/4” from each side of the drawn line on each pair, then cutting along the line to make two HSTs:

Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery

Press with the seam towards the darker fabric and trim to 2.5” x 2.5”, making sure the 45º line on your ruler is in line with the seam. You will end up with 28 HSTs:

Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery

Lay out your pieces to match the block diagram and sew together:

Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery

Add the sashing according to the block layout diagrams. Attach the 12.5” pieces to the top and bottom of the block first, press, then add the 18.5” strips to the sides.

Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery

That’s it for this month – see you in November!

Comments { 1 }

Star Block of the Month: August is the Sawtooth Star #starbotm

I’m so thrilled to have Charlotte Newland leading our first-ever Block of the Month adventure! Charlotte will be teaching a class on this month’s block, the Sawtooth Star, on Monday, 17 August, 6:30pm – 9pm. If you’re following along at home, you can find all of the blog posts about the Star Block of the Month here and we sell kits here. Don’t forget to tag any Instagram posts related to the Star Block of the Month with #starbotm. Take it away, Charlotte!

Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery

Welcome back to the Star Block of the Month! It’s another simple summer-friendly block this month, made with squares and flying geese – the sawtooth star.

We will be sewing two 8” blocks (8.5” unfinished), and making them up to 12″ (12.5″ unfinished) with sashing. Both blocks are sashed identically. This diagram gives you the arrangement of colours in the block. As usual, the blank areas are sewn from background fabric:

Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery

Cool palette:

Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery

Warm palette:

Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery

Cut the following for each block:

Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery


First, we will use the no-waste method to make the flying geese. Take your four 2 7/8″ colour 2 squares and draw a diagonal line across each one. Place two of the squares right sides together with the 5.25″ background square, sew a scant 1/4″ from each side of the line, then cut in half as below:

Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery

Press the triangle pieces away, then sew another colour 2 square to each of these two pieces, stitching a scant 1/4″ away from the drawn line as usual. Cut each of these in half, press the coloured triangle away from the background piece, and trim each flying goose to 4.5″ x 2.5″:

Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery

Lay out your pieces to match the block diagram and sew together:

Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery

Repeat with the other set of fabrics to make a pair of blocks, then cut the sashing strips for each block:

Add sashing according to the block layout diagrams (both blocks are sashed in the same way). Attach the 8.5” pieces to the top and bottom of the block first, press, then add the 12.5” strips to the sides.

Star Block of the Month from The Village Haberdashery

That’s it for now, see you in September!

Comments { 0 }

Star Block of the Month: July is the Friendship Star #starbotm

I’m so thrilled to have Charlotte Newland leading our first-ever Block of the Month adventure! If you’re following along at home, you can find all of the blog posts about the Star Block of the Month here and we sell kits here. Don’t forget to tag any Instagram posts related to the Star Block of the Month with #starbotm. Take it away, Charlotte!

Welcome back to the Star Block of the Month! Because it’s a busy time of year we are making a really simple block this month – the friendship star. It uses squares and half square triangles, so shouldn’t take you away from eating ice cream for too long!

Star Block of the Month on The Daily Stitch

We will be sewing four 6” blocks (6.5” unfinished), without sashing. Each block uses a single colour, listed in the table below:

Cut the following for each block:

Star Block of the Month on The Daily Stitch

Let’s make those half-square triangles. Draw a diagonal line across the wrong side of the two 3.5” background squares, and put them in pairs with the 3.5” coloured squares:

Star Block of the Month on The Daily Stitch

Sew a scant 1/4” from each side of the drawn line on each pair, then cut along the line to make two HSTs. Press with the seam towards the darker fabric, and trim to 2.5” x 2.5”, making sure the 45º line on your ruler is in line with the seam:

Star Block of the Month on The Daily Stitch

Repeat so you have four HSTs:

Star Block of the Month on The Daily Stitch

Lay out the pieces as below, sew them into rows and then sew the rows together:

Star Block of the Month on The Daily Stitch

Repeat for each colour, to make four super-quick friendship star blocks:

Star Block of the Month on The Daily Stitch

That’s it! Now back to the sunbathing. See you in September.

Comments { 1 }

Star Block of the Month: June is the Exploding Star #starbotm

I’m so thrilled to have Charlotte Newland leading our first-ever Block of the Month adventure! She’ll be teaching a new block the first week of every month on The Daily Stitch and the second Monday of the month in our West Hampstead shop. The Exploding Star class is this Monday, 8 June at 6:30pm and you can sign up here!

If you’re following along at home, you can find all of the blog posts about the Star Block of the Month here and we sell kits here. Don’t forget to tag any Instagram posts related to the Star Block of the Month with #starbotm. Take it away, Charlotte!

Welcome back to the Star Block of the Month! This month we are making the Exploding Star, which uses no-waste flying geese, half square triangles, and has an economy block in the middle.

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery

We will be sewing two 18” blocks (18.5” unfinished), without sashing. This diagram gives you the arrangement of colours in the block. As usual, the blank areas are sewn from background fabric:

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery

Cool palette:

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery



Warm palette:

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery



Cut the following for each block:

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery



First, we are going to make the centre of the block, a simple economy block. Cut the two 4” x 4” colour 3 squares in half diagonally. I like to starch them before cutting to minimise the wibbly bias edge effect. Sew the triangles to the 4.75” background square as shown below, then trim to 6.5” square, making sure that the points where the seams intersect are at least 1/4” away from the edge, otherwise you will lose them in your seam allowance when you sew the block together.

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery
Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery



Next we will use the no-waste method to make the flying geese. Take your four 3 7/8″ colour 2 squares and draw a diagonal line across each one. Place two of the squares right sides together with the 7.25″ background square, sew a scant 1/4″ from each side of the line, then cut in half as below:

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery
Press the triangle pieces away, then sew another colour 2 square to each of these two pieces, stitching a scant 1/4″ away from the drawn line as usual. Cut each of these in half, press the coloured triangle away from the background piece, and trim each flying goose to 6.5″ x 3.5″:
Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery
Repeat this process using the four 3 7/8″ colour 3 squares and 7.25″ colour 2 square to make a total of eight flying geese units (four of each set):
Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery

Finally we need to make half-square triangles. Draw a diagonal line across the wrong side of the four 4.5” background squares, and put them in pairs with the 4.5” colour 1 squares. Sew a scant 1/4” from each side of the drawn line on each pair, then cut along the line to make two HSTs. Press with the seam towards the darker fabric, and trim to 3.5” x 3.5”, making sure the 45º line on your ruler is in line with the seam:

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery

Lay out your pieces to match the block diagram and sew together:

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery

Repeat with the other set of fabrics to make a pair of blocks:

Star Block of the Month at The Village Haberdashery

That’s it for this month – see you in July!

Comments { 0 }

Star Block of the Month: May is the Amish Star #starbotm

I’m so thrilled to have Charlotte Newland leading our first-ever Block of the Month adventure! She’ll be teaching a new block the first week of every month on The Daily Stitch and the second Monday of the month in our West Hampstead shop. The Amish Star class is this Monday, 11 May at 6:30pm and you can sign up here!

If you’re following along at home, you can find all of the blog posts about the Star Block of the Month here and we sell kits here. Don’t forget to tag any Instagram posts related to the Star Block of the Month with #starbotm. Take it away, Charlotte!

Welcome back to the Star Block of the Month! This month we are making the Amish Star, which uses no-waste flying geese and half square triangles.

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm

We will be sewing two 12” blocks (12.5” unfinished) and making them up to 18.5” (unfinished) with sashing. This diagram gives you the arrangement of colours in the block. As usual, the blank areas are sewn from background fabric:

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm

Cool palette:

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm

Warm palette:

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm

Cut the following for each block:

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm

First we are going to make the flying geese using the no-waste method just like last month. Take your four 2 7/8″ background squares and draw a diagonal line across each one. Place two of the squares right sides together with the 5.25″ colour 1 square, sew a scant 1/4″ from each side of the line, then cut in half as below:

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm

Press the triangle pieces away, then sew another background square to each of these two pieces, stitching a scant 1/4″ away from the drawn line as usual. Cut each of these in half, press the background triangle away from the colour 1 piece, and trim each flying goose to 4.5″ x 2.5″:

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm

Next we need to make half-square triangles. Draw a diagonal line across the wrong side of the four 3.5” background squares, and put them in pairs with the 3.5” colour 2 squares. Sew a scant 1/4” from each side of the drawn line on each pair of squares, then cut along the line to make two HSTs. Press with the seam towards the darker fabric, and trim to 2.5” x 2.5”, making sure the 45º line on your ruler is in line with the seam:

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm

Lay out your pieces to match the block diagram and sew together to make a 12.5” block:

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm

Cut the sashing strips as below, then add them according to the block layout diagrams. The sashing strips are the same size for both blocks, only the layout is different.

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm



Attach the 12.5” pieces to the top and bottom of the block first, press, then add the 18.5” strips to the sides.

Star Block of the Month with The Village Haberdashery #starbotm



That’s it for this month – see you in June!

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