Scoot Scoot kid-size messenger bag

Havana Monaluna messenger bag

Next month we’ll be featuring the Havana collection by Monaluna in our window, and I’ve been sewing up a few things to go on the “boy” dress form (which is also sometimes a girl!) Although our little man won’t be able to use/wear anything I’m making for a good six years, it’s kind of fun to imagine. We sort of picture him as a little future web entrepreneur, so this kid-size messenger bag in a scooter print seemed fitting!

Scoot Scoot kid-size messenger bag

The idea came from Sarah Jane’s Out to Sea booth from last Spring Market but when it came time to sew I decided to use the free pattern from mmmCrafts that I used to make the typewriter messenger bag. I love this pattern. It is so incredibly easy, and I made it even easier by eliminating pockets and using velcro instead of a snap for the closure. It’s for the kiddo, after all. To make it kid-size, all I did was reduce the pattern to 75%. And since there really isn’t a pattern, that’s super quick to do. Of course I won’t copy the pattern here, but to illustrate how simple it is to adjust the size, have a look at the pieces:

mmmcrafts messenger bag

Credit: mmmcrafts

If you’re also making this for a kid sans pockets, all you’ll need to cut are the following. I just grabbed a cup nearby to cut the curved corners on the flap – don’t stress about getting the perfect size for that.

  • Main piece and lining: 10.5″ x 18.75″
  • Flap and lining: 9″ x 10.125″
  • Strap: 33.75″ x 3″

Havana Monaluna messenger bag

You can seriously whip this up in an hour if you’re good – it took me about two as I was partially distracted re-watching Freaks and Geeks. If I were to offer any other tips on sewing this, I might suggest interfacing the lining to give it a bit more strength and structure. Both the Havana and the Kona Surf I used for lining are fairly substantial medium weight cottons, but it could take a beating when it’s actually being used by a small person. Your call!

Watch this space for more project ideas from our upcoming February window!

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